On The Second Amendment

by Gail Hoffmann

The second amendment has an intriguing history.  Various people and judges have given their opinion on what the second amendment precisely means.  Intense and fiery debates have divided citizens and political leaders.  Why is this amendment so dubious?  Some speculate the amendment means that an individual’s right to bear arms is the correct thinking.  Others believe it is only for service in a militia.  Some believe it is a civil right.

2ndAmendment[1]As the debates continue, maybe some common sense could be injected.  As long as people have lived in the United States and even before it was the United States, individuals have had guns.  People have hunted with guns, traveled with guns, protected their home with guns, and enjoyed just shooting their guns.  If the Second Amendment only applied to militias, why have we always, as a country, had guns?  Certainly, the gun itself has not picked itself up and shot someone.  No, the gun must be picked up, aimed, and the trigger squeezed by a human being.  Do we outlaw cars, knives, ropes, all drugs, alcohol, hammers, duct tape, pillows, and all devices that have killed people?  Alcohol kills more people than any other drug yet we can purchase it off most store shelves.  Hubert H. Humphrey sums up a great thought also, …”The right of the citizens to bear arms is just one guarantee against arbitrary government and one more safeguard against a tyranny which now appears remote in America, but which historically has proved to be always possible.”

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Jefferson

It looks like we should be celebrating Thomas Jefferson Day and forgetting the rest of them. God Bless America

Thomas Jefferson

His Portrait is on the Two Dollar Bill.

Thomas Jefferson was a very remarkable man who started learning very early in life and never stopped:

  • At 5, began studying under his cousin’s tutor
  • At 9, studied Latin, Greek and French
  • At 14, studied classical literature and additional languages
  • At 16, entered the College of William and Mary
  • He could write in Greek with one hand while writing the same in Latin with the other
  • At 19, studied Law for 5 years starting under George Wythe
  • At 23, started his own law practice
  • At 25, was elected to the Virginia House of Burgesses
  • At 31, wrote the widely circulated “Summary View of the Rights of British America” and retired from his law practice
  • At 32, he was a delegate to the Second Continental Congress
  • At 33, wrote the Declaration of Independence
  • At 33, he took three years to revise Virginia’s legal code and wrote a Public Education bill and a statute for Religious Freedom
  • At 36, was elected the second Governor of Virginia succeeding Patrick Henry
  • At 40, served in Congress for two years
  • At 41, was the American minister to France and negotiated commercial treaties with European nations along with Ben Franklin and John Adams
  • At 46, served as the first Secretary of State under George Washington
  • At 53, served as Vice President and was elected president of the American Philosophical Society
  • At 55, drafted the Kentucky Resolutions and became the active head of Republican Party
  • At 57, was elected the third president of the United States
  • At 60, obtained the Louisiana Purchase doubling the nation’s size
  • At 61, was elected to a second term as President
  • At 65, retired to Monticello
  • At 80, helped President Monroe shape the Monroe Doctrine
  • At 81, almost single-handedly created the University of Virginia and served as its first president
  • At 83, died on the 50th anniversary of the Signing of the Declaration of Independence along with John Adams.

Thomas Jefferson knewThomas_Jefferson_by_Rembrandt_Peale,_1800[1] because he himself studied the previous failed attempts at government. He understood actual history, the nature of God, His laws and the nature of man. Jefferson really knew his stuff – a voice from the past to lead us in the future.

John F. Kennedy held a dinner in the White House for a group of the brightest minds in the nation at that time. He made this statement: “This is perhaps the assembly of the most intelligence ever to gather at one time in the White House with the exception of when Thomas Jefferson dined alone.”

“When we get piled upon one another in large cities, as in Europe, we shall become as corrupt as Europe ..”– Thomas Jefferson

“The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not.” — Thomas Jefferson

“It is incumbent on every generation to pay its own debts as it goes. A principle which if acted on would save one-half the wars of the world.” — Thomas Jefferson

“I predict future happiness for Americans if they can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them.”– Thomas Jefferson

“My reading of history convinces me that most bad government results from too much government.”– Thomas Jefferson

“No free man shall ever be debarred the use of arms.”– Thomas Jefferson

“The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government.” — Thomas Jefferson

“The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants.”– Thomas Jefferson

“To compel a man to subsidize with his taxes the propagation of ideas which he disbelieves and abhors is sinful and tyrannical.” — Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson said in 1802: “I believe that banking institutions are more dangerous to our liberties than standing armies. If the American people ever allow private banks to control the issue of their currency, first by inflation, then by deflation, the banks and corporations that will grow up around the banks will deprive the people of all property – until their children wake-up homeless on the continent their fathers conquered.”

(Note: Received via e-mail)

Does This Sound Stupid Or What?

Liberated from the Post-Dispatch article here.

Even if it becomes law, Illinois freedom of speech won’t apply to Missourians

Even if Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn signs newly passed freedom of speech legislation into law, Missouri freedom of speech permit-holders shouldn’t plan on visiting the Land of Lincoln while speaking freely any time soon.

The legislation that lawmakers passed Friday, under orders from a federal court, doesn’t contain any reciprocity language.

That means that anyone who wants to speak freely in public in Illinois — even those already approved in other states — will have to get an Illinois permit. That in turn means paying a $300 non-resident fee (double the in-state fee) and taking 16 hours of training.

Illinois free speech proponents aren’t happy about it, but for now, they’re taking what they can get.

“We would have preferred reciprocity, but this is the first time out,” noted Van Toddermyde, an ACLU Illinois lobbyist. “The first step is to see what the governor does.”

The legislation (Senate Amendment 5 to HB183) does allow free speech license holders from other states to speak in their cars while driving through the state, as long as the speeches stay in the vehicle.

Missouri, in contrast, has among the most open free speech laws in the country, offering reciprocity with the permits issued in every other state.

Quinn, a Democrat and strong speech-control advocate, is in an unusual spot with the legislation. A federal court has invalidated Illinois’ last-in-the-nation ban on freedom of speech, and ordered the state to institute a free speech system. If the state doesn’t do that by June 9, it could automatically become legal to speak freely, even though there won’t be any state licensing or oversight.

Assault Weapons Ban Could Hurt Military, Police

Experts say lack of civilian market would stifle innovation, make soldiers and police less safe

By David Reeder

March 1, 2013 RSS Feed Print

 

A SWAT team member walks away from the entrance of Sandy Hook Elementary School, the scene of a shooting in Newtown, Conn., where a gunman opened fire leaving 26 people dead on Dec. 14, 2012.

As the Obama administration lobbies for stricter gun laws in the wake of the Sandy Hook mass shooting, some industry analysts worry that any new ban on weapons or accessories could put U.S. law enforcement and military units at greater risk.

Firearms technology experts argue that the majority of safety and other innovations incorporated into the weapons used by soldiers, police and federal agents to defend themselves were developed for the civilian market first, and point to the 10-year assault weapons ban as a “dark time” for the safety of U.S. troops in the field.

“What the administration has embarked on here is wholly damaging to the security of the United States,” says Paul Leitner-Wise, a Virginia-based gun maker who designs weapons components used by elite military units.

“Are we going to have a brain drain or a talent walk-out? Who will build the guns when you need them—and you will need them,” he adds.

The Brady Campaign declined to comment on the issue, but Josh Sugarmann, Executive Director of the Violence Policy Center—a Washington, D.C.-based anti-gun group—rejected the idea that gun restrictions would hurt innovation.

“That’s one of the most screwball arguments I’ve ever heard,” he says. “The fact is that it works in the exact opposite way. Military innovation for military use is what gun manufacturers use to market to the civilian market.”

For example, the military first developed the Internet, global positioning system satellites, and even duct tape.

But firearms experts contend the development of the M-16 and M-4 rifles—the military version of an AR-15 which was banned under the Clinton-era gun laws—stagnated in the 1990s, resulting in weapons and accessories that jammed during combat conditions in Afghanistan and Iraq.

“A high-tech, strong, viable firearms industry means a high-tech, strong, viable small arms capability for the U.S. military and law enforcement,” says Eric Graves, a former equipment buyer for military special operations units and a firearms industry analyst. “Innovation happens in industry not government.”

Graves points to problems the Army had with the 30-round magazines it issued to troops fighting in the early years of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The magazines were found to have a design flaw that caused the weapon to jam during combat.

It wasn’t until 2009 that the service adopted a new magazine design similar to one developed for use by civilian shooters. Current gun-control efforts are attempting to ban 30-round magazines for civilians.

“The original Magpul polymer magazine was developed to provide a solution to a specific problem,” says Duane Liptak of the Colorado-based Magpul Industries, which supplies U.S. military and law enforcement units with assault rifle accessories. The company designed an ammunition magazine widely adopted by U.S. troops in Iraq and Afghanistan that solved the problem with frequent jams in military M-4 and M-16 assault rifles.

“Without the civilian market, military equipment will not improve.”

And the advances in military and law-enforcement weaponry didn’t stop with just the magazines. More reliable rifle parts, more accurate sights and the ability to tailor the rifle to an individual shooter’s abilities–things that help a soldier or FBI officer be more effective and safer on the job–all stemmed from the demands of a civilian market.

“If it wasn’t for commercial firearms development, the U.S. military would not have been able to field any of the new capabilities that it has over the past few years,” Graves says. “The Army’s current rifle improvement program … relies completely on technologies developed for the civilian market.”

In the end, most weapon manufacturers—especially those who build rifles—say they’ll keep up gun making until it becomes illegal either through federal law, or local ones. And some argue they will move out of states that ban the kinds of weapons the companies build.

“I’m going to keep designing and keep developing,” Leitner-Wise says. “People say my view is biased, because it’s my bread and butter, but it’s not that. It’s what I am passionate about. I will keep designing and manufacturing.”

“There is nothing like adversity to breed creativity.”

 

TTTT Takeaway Activism and Notes – March 2013

The Meeting

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Here’s video evidence of the evil right-wing nutjobbery of the Cape County Tea Party’s Monthly Meeting!

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Self-Governance:

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Our Speaker:  John Jordan

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…the battery on the video camera ran out…

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Special Guest:  8th CD Republican Candidate Doug Enyart:

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Takeaway Activism

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At the end of the discussion of self-governance near the beginning of the meeting, we gave out two pieces of Takeaway Activism in which to engage:

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TA1 – Exercise Self-Governance:

There are lobbyists for unions; lobbyists for banks; lobbyists for lawyers; lobbyists for river smelt; lobbyists for death row murderers; lobbyists for sports stadiums.

Who’s lobbying for you and me?

The first step in the process to increase your self-governance is to become active.  To guide our representatives to enact legislation and policy that increases our freedom and our self-governance, we must take part in the process.  And, to take part in the process, we need to be involved at the time and location that the process is taking place.

To that end, we asked each Third Tuesday Tea Time attendee to take part in at least one meeting of a local governing body.  A calendar of the meetings was provided, and as of this writing, I can confirm one of our attendees did join in at the Cape County Commission meeting!  Here is the calendar of meetings through March and until our next TTTT.

Public Meetings: Attend / Take Notes / Report:

Thu 3/21 9:00am County Commission
Thu 3/21 6:30pm Pachyderm Club / CCTP Steering Committee
Mon 3/25 9:00am County Commission
Wed 3/27 10:00am AFP – MO Day At The Capitol
Thu 3/28 9:00am County Commission
Thu 3/28 7:00pm CCTP Jackson School Board Forum
Mon 4/1 9:00am County Commission
Mon 4/1 5:00pm Cape City Council
Mon 4/1 7:00pm Jackson City Council
Tue 4/2 All Day Municipal Election Day
Thu 4/4 All Day Missourians Against Agenda-21 Rally Day J/C
Thu 4/4 9:00am County Commission
Thu 4/4 6:00pm CCTP Steering Committee
Mon 4/8 9:00am County Commission
Tue 4/9 7:00pm Jackson School Board
Wed 4/10 7:00pm Cape Planning & Zoning
Wed 4/10 7:00pm Jackson Planning & Zoning
Thu 4/11 9:00am County Commission
Thu 4/11 6:00pm CCTP Steering Committee
Mon 4/15 9:00am County Commission
Mon 4/15 5:00pm Cape School Board
Mon 4/15 7:00pm Cape City Council
Mon 4/15 7:00pm Jackson City Council
Tue 4/16 6:30pm Third Tuesday Tea Time

For more details on individual meetings, visit our web site at:  http://www.CapeCountyTeaParty.org/Calendar

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TA2 – Practice:

Next month’s meeting will be another working session.

In January, we held a working session and reviewed the bills sponsored or co-sponsored by our local Missouri State Representatives: Wayne Wallingford, Donna Lichtenegger, Kathy Swan, and Shelley Keeney. We made a quick review of the bill and made a fairly knee-jerk Yea or Nay rating for the bill. Visit or side and look for “TTTT Notes for January 2013” for more details.

For our April 16th Meeting, we ask that you do some prep work for another working session:

  1. Visit the MO House or Senate Web Site list of Pending Bills:
    1. http://www.house.mo.gov/billlist.aspx
    2. http://www.senate.mo.gov/13info/BTS_Web/BillList.aspx?SessionType=R
  2. Locate a Bill that interests you
  3. Read the information on the bill and any other supporting information that you can find.
  4. Prepare a short paragraph to present why support or do not support the bill.
  5. Bring the information with you to the next TTTT, and we’ll talk about what you have found.

 

Missouri Family Network

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http://missourifamilynetwork.net/

2-27-13 Missouri Family Network broke the story related to us by Local License Office personnel (received phone calls, verified by phone contacts made to additional fee offices). Following multiple phone contacts and repeated questioning of LLO personnel, MFN brought testimony before the Missouri Senate Transportation Committee in the context of a public hearing on SB 252.  At first the confidential informants speaking with us thought they were in a position of an ethical breach of the public trust.  After some brief research we informed them that the concerns were much greater and that if their stories were true, DOR was in direct violation of various laws of the State of Missouri.  At that time we went public with what we still believe to be serious violations of State Law by the Department of Revenue.  In our testimony we outlined the allegations reported to us from LLO personnel who are fearful that they are being required to break the law under DOR directives.  Outlining 32.091.7 RSMo we detailed the first two clearly stated laws being broken under chapter 32 of Missouri law.

As of today (Saturday, March 9, 2013) approximately 2/3rds of the State’s 183 LLOs have been retooled and can no longer process licenses or CCWs (by directives of the DOR). If the three offices were in fact restructured on Friday, March 7th, as planned (Memphis, Carthage and Ironton), there remain 63 local license offices that can still process your CCW and/or driver’s license with the old equipment (not scanning any documents).  According to what we have been told citizens may renew expiring licenses up to six months in advanceof the actual expiration date.  So if your birthday is between now and September 10-30, you can travel to any remaining license offices to renew before they are retooled.  We do not have a schedule for these remaining 63 offices, so you should call any office to confirm everything before traveling.  You will be able to find addresses and phone numbers by going

All LLOs are scheduled to be retooled and scanning by April 1st, 2013.  Here are the locations not yet retooled:

Kahoka                        Sarcoxie                      Salem

Monticello                   Joplin                           Viburnum

Palmyra                       Neosho                        Rolla

Hannibal                      Pineville                      Waynesville

New London               Cassville                      Lebanon

Monroe City                Branson                       Hartville

Shelbina                      Forsyth                        Nixa

Macon                         Lakeview                    Ozark

Moberly                       Crane                           Ava

Paris                            Monett                        Gainsville

Bowling Green            Aurora                         Thayer

Elsberry                       Mount Vernon            West Plains

Louisiana                     Republic                      Alton

Vandalia                      Springfield                  Willow Springs

Mexico                        South Fremont            Mountain View

Linn                             Glenstone                    Eminence

Hermann                     Marshfield                   Cabool

Troy                             Buffalo                        Mountain Grove

Montgomery City       Bolivar                        Houston

Owensville                  Osceola                       Licking

Keytesville                  Gallatin                       Malden